PHYSICS HOMEWORK #32

I dont understand exactly your question about the possible permutations of what? Thread starter rcgldr Start date Mar 20, I Permutation of identical elements. The issue here is that I’m trying to determing the probability of each case where the containers are treated as distinct, as opposed to the number of permutations. How do we grade questions? I’m having a hard time in my lab write up actually explaining how this set up verifies Newton’s 2nd law.

But essentially that may well have been a complication rather than a simplification – fewer steps maybe but more analysis. I can easily apply this to other numbers of bins, but changing the number of events is a little slower. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. I already have the answer for this, but wondering if there’s some efficient way to calculate this. Corrections final terms were ok, the intemediate terms for 2of2 and 3of3 were multiplied but left inside parenthesis , corrected equations:

physics homework #32

I’m not sure I understand how the mass is the constant, as the hanging weight changes each test, only the weight on the track is constant. I Permutation of identical elements. In order to get the number of permutations with various numbers of pnysics used, first physivs the possible bin choices for that chosen numbers of bins B – each of which takes one object initially – then calculate the ways of distributing the remaining 7-B objects into those bins.

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nomework What are the possible permutations? The main issue was that the probability of these patterns is based on permutations instead of combinations. Post as a guest Name. First calculate the number of ways 7 items can go into n bins, none empty, using this expansion series: I dont understand exactly your question about the possible permutations of what?

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The right-hand side is the total mass of the two-mass system multiplied by the its common acceleration. So it produces a very straight line, the data line up very well and produce a hoomework line of best fit.

That might be appropriate for your application; I really don’t know enough to judge. First, your list of numbers are actually the number of ways of putting 7 distinct items, not identical items, into physica.

Corrections final terms were ok, the intemediate terms for 2of2 and 3of3 were multiplied but left inside parenthesiscorrected equations: Then I found a line of best fit: The acceleration is essentially the acceleration due to gravity. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Sign up using Email and Password. Related General Math News on Phys.

homework and exercises – Verifying Newton’s 2nd Law – Physics Stack Exchange

Then #2 divided gravity by each calculated acceleration so I ended physicw with 6 new numbers. I can easily apply this to other numbers of bins, but changing the number of events is a little slower. The issue here is that I’m trying to determing the probability of each case where the containers are treated as distinct, as opposed to the number of permutations.

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Hopefully that is enough for you to see that what you discovered is Newton’s 2nd law. For example, with 4 bins used: Unicorn Meta Zoo 3: Note yomework 7 items into 4 containers is the same as rolling a 4 sided die 7 times and noting the outcome, so this method can be used for permutations or probability of rolling a die several times. But essentially that may well have been a complication rather than a simplification – fewer steps maybe but more analysis.

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IS all that is needed to verify it? Amazingly phhysics lines of thought. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Probabilities, 7 items, 4 containers. Now, there is the slight complication that the pulley does exert a force on your system, but it’s safe to ignore this and just picture everything in one-dimension.

Thanks for the response.

physics homework #32

Extending these general cases to particular 5, 6 and 7 bins: Your logic treats both containers and objects as distinct. Right, it’s the acceleration which is constant. The distribution of balls in the container is random.